Select Page


………………

Recent Articles:

• Scientists Are Harvesting Water By Building Fog Harps And Zapping The Air
• This Device Sucks Drinking Water Out Of Dry Desert Air, Powered Only By The Sun

………………

Skywater Wins XPrize

Original Link

During Visioneering 2018, XPRIZE’s annual gathering of philanthropists and innovators to evaluate concepts for future competitions, the Foundation revealed the results of its latest, completed XPRIZE. The Skysource / Skywater Alliance was announced as the grand prize winner of the $1.75M Water Abundance XPRIZE, a two-year competition aimed at alleviating the global water crisis with energy-efficient technologies that harvest fresh water from thin air. 97 teams from 27 countries participated in the competition.

The Water Abundance XPRIZE, powered by the Tata Group and Australian Aid, was launched in 2016 at the United Nations in New Delhi. The Skysource / Skywater Alliance, based in Venice Beach, California, received a grand prize of $1.5M for developing an easily deployable high-volume water generator that can be used in any climate, meeting the competition parameters of extracting a minimum of 2,000 liters of water per day from the atmosphere using 100 percent renewable energy, at a cost of no more than two cents per liter. A second team, JMCC WING, based in South Point, Hawaii, received a $150K prize to acknowledge the team’s ingenuity in developing a unique technological approach.

………………

• The Skysource / Skywater Alliance
• JMCC WING

………………

This Machine Can Make Gallons Of Fresh Drinking Water Right Out Of Thin Air
By Doug Criss
CNN
October 25, 2018

Original Link

Machines designed by a California-based team can produce, in some cases, up to 300 gallons of fresh drinking water a day by pulling it straight from the air. And the team just won a $1.5 million prize for it.

The machines, dubbed Skywater, were created by the Skysource/Skywater Alliance, a team of sustainability experts from Venice, California. Skywater machines, housed in big metal boxes, are atmospheric water generators that condense water vapor from the atmosphere and turn it into drinking water. The machines can be powered by solar energy or the burning of biofuels. Depending on the model, they can be used for households, for farming or for emergency relief efforts.

The prize, called the Water Abundance XPRIZE, was awarded Saturday by XPRIZE, a California nonprofit that runs competitions with sometimes multimillion dollars in prize money aimed at creating solutions for the world’s problems. The Water Abundance XPRIZE was a two-year competition that sought to find answers to the global water crisis by facilitating the development of new technologies.

David Hertz, one of leaders of the Skysource/Skywater Alliance, says he’s excited about what the Skywater machines could do for people living in parts of the world where water is becoming more scarce.

“I’ve just been very, very interested in water … but also the importance of fresh water to mankind,” Hertz, an architect who specializes in constructing sustainable buildings, says in a video on the team’s website. “And in being in California, the issues are fast approaching crisis proportions.”

Hertz says there’s more than enough water vapor in the air from which the machines can extract to produce gallons of water every day. Hertz estimates there’s about “37.5 million billion gallons of water” in the atmosphere at any given time, which Skysource says is more fresh water than in all the rivers on Earth.

………………

………………

………………

Warka Water

………………

………………

………………

• Warka Water Website
• Warka Water on Facebook
• Warka Water on Twitter
• Warka Water Photos
Warka Water on YouTube

………………

THIS TOWER PULLS DRINKING WATER OUT OF THIN AIR
By Tuan C. Nguyen
smithsonian.com
April 8, 2014

Original Link

In some parts of Ethiopia, finding potable water is a six-hour journey.

People in the region spend 40 billion hours a year trying to find and collect water, says a group called the Water Project. And even when they find it, the water is often not safe, collected from ponds or lakes teeming with infectious bacteria, contaminated with animal waste or other harmful substances.

The water scarcity issue — which affects nearly 1 billion people in Africa alone — has drawn the attention of big-name philanthropists like actor and Water.org co-founder Matt Damon and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, who, through their respective nonprofits, have poured millions of dollars into research and solutions, coming up with things like a system that converts toilet water to drinking water and a “Re-invent the Toilet Challenge,” among others.

Critics, however, have their doubts about integrating such complex technologies in remote villages that don’t even have access to a local repairman. Costs and maintenance could render many of these ideas impractical.

“If the many failed development projects of the past 60 years have taught us anything,” wrote one critic, Toilets for People founder Jason Kasshe, in a New York Times editorial, “it’s that complicated, imported solutions do not work.”

Other low-tech inventions, like this life straw, aren’t as complicated, but still rely on users to find a water source.

It was this dilemma — supplying drinking water in a way that’s both practical and convenient — that served as the impetus for a new product called Warka Water, an inexpensive, easily-assembled structure that extracts gallons of fresh water from the air.

The invention from Arturo Vittori, an industrial designer, and his colleague Andreas Vogler doesn’t involve complicated gadgetry or feats of engineering, but instead relies on basic elements like shape and material and the ways in which they work together.

At first glance, the 30-foot-tall, vase-shaped towers, named after a fig tree native to Ethiopia, have the look and feel of a showy art installation. But every detail, from carefully-placed curves to unique materials, has a functional purpose.

The rigid outer housing of each tower is comprised of lightweight and elastic juncus stalks, woven in a pattern that offers stability in the face of strong wind gusts while still allowing air to flow through. A mesh net made of nylon or polypropylene, which calls to mind a large Chinese lantern, hangs inside, collecting droplets of dew that form along the surface. As cold air condenses, the droplets roll down into a container at the bottom of the tower. The water in the container then passes through a tube that functions as a faucet, carrying the water to those waiting on the ground.

Using mesh to facilitate clean drinking water isn’t an entirely new concept. A few years back, an MIT student designed a fog-harvesting device with the material. But Vittori’s invention yields more water, at a lower cost, than some other concepts that came before it.

“[In Ethiopia], public infrastructures do not exist and building [something like] a well is not easy,” Vittori says of the country. “To find water, you need to drill in the ground very deep, often as much as 1,600 feet. So it’s technically difficult and expensive. Moreover, pumps need electricity to run as well as access to spare parts in case the pump breaks down.”

So how would Warka Water’s low-tech design hold up in remote sub-Saharan villages? Internal field tests have shown that one Warka Water tower can supply more than 25 gallons of water throughout the course of a day, Vittori claims. He says because the most important factor in collecting condensation is the difference in temperature between nightfall and daybreak, the towers are proving successful even in the desert, where temperatures, in that time, can differ as much as 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

The structures, made from biodegradable materials, are easy to clean and can be erected without mechanical tools in less than a week. Plus, he says, “once locals have the necessary know-how, they will be able to teach other villages and communities to build the Warka.”

In all, it costs about $500 to set up a tower — less than a quarter of the cost of something like the Gates toilet, which costs about $2,200 to install and more to maintain. If the tower is mass produced, the price would be even lower, Vittori says. His team hopes to install two Warka Towers in Ethiopia by next year and is currently searching for investors who may be interested in scaling the water harvesting technology across the region.

“It’s not just illnesses that we’re trying to address. Many Ethiopian children from rural villages spend several hours every day to fetch water, time they could invest for more productive activities and education,” he says. “If we can give people something that lets them be more independent, they can free themselves from this cycle.”

………………

………………

Other Warka Water Articles:

• Handwoven Dew Collecting Tower Aims To Ease Africa’s Water Crisis
• This Tower Pulls Drinking Water Out of Thin Air
• The 30ft High Bamboo ‘Flower Basket’ That Can Pluck Drinking Water From Thin Air
• A Giant Basket That Uses Condensation to Gather Drinking Water

………………

WaterSeer

WaterSeer Website
WaterSeer Blog

………………

Drought Masters

Drought Masters Website

………………

WaterGen

WaterGen Website
WaterGen on Facebook
WaterGen on YouTube

………………

Clean Water Foundation

Creating Water Foundation Website

………………

Hector Pino’s Fresh Water Machine

Fresh Water Solutions Website

………………

Professor Omar Yaghi & MOF Technology

Learn more about Omar Yaghi & MOF Technology

………………

More Water From Thin Air Breakthroughs

DrinkableAir
• Extracting Water From Thin Air
• Element Four
• Watercones

You can support this website by using the amazing, super-fast, crypto-friendly Brave Web Browser